Sunday, 8 December 2013

Having Parents, Still Orphans?



When I see today’s parents my mind is bombarded with several questions.  Where are those parents who were always there to watch you when you played, who solved your difficult math problems, who taught you dance steps for your annual dance competition? Where are those parents who reprimanded you when you told a lie or stole a fancy thing from your classmate? Those parents who read to you bedtime stories and kissed you goodnight are lost. I have seen those parents but now I can see them no more. It’s like they have hidden under the invisibility cloak

                In the era of instant connection, the connection between the parents and children is lost. In a bid to provide for all the material things to the children, parents work all day and all night; leaving their children with maids or babysitters who are illiterate and don’t care in the least about their child. Those maids or babysitters are people who don’t know a thing about the parents’ culture and about their systems and worst is that most of them are illiterate. Parents who consider those maids lower than themselves in intelligence, status and standards are basically giving them their children to raise. And here I am not talking about the poor or middle class people, here I am talking about those filthy rich people who can easily find time to be with their children and take proper care of them, but sadly they don’t.

Those parents who leave their children when they are sleeping at early dawn and arrive home when they are already put to bed; the only time they spend with them is when they get a holiday. How would those children ever know what parenting is and how parents are with their children? They wouldn’t because their parents are never around. Birth-Givers think that by providing lavish lifestyle and putting children in hi-fi schools they are showing to the world how much they love them. But they are children and not a person whom one can impress with fancy things. They crave for their parents attention and for their time, they want their parents to play with them and to listen to their crazy stories. But alas! They have to play with robotic machines instead.
image courtesy : Google

                             “Your children need your presence more than your presents”. -Anonymous

                The reason behind all the nasty habits and behaviors and silly tantrums, we see in those children when they grow up, is that their parents were never there to teach them what was right and what was wrong. Those parents were busy in their own world when their children started on to the wrong path. These kinds of parents are the one who spoil their own child by their own hands. Spoon feeding them at all times. Instead of punishing the child for getting low marks and hence not getting admission in the college , they would tell their sons and daughters ‘not to worry ,I will get you in’. If they are capable enough to give pocket money to their children then why are they not capable in keeping an eagle’s eye on where they spend that money? Isn’t that necessary? Getting things before the right time comes and getting their problem solved the wrong way, those children do suffer a lot when life tests them. We many times blame people for not handling the situation well, we often tag them as stubborn or selfish this is because they were not brought up properly by their parents, they are not to be blamed.

                Soon I realized that the increase in the number of drug and binge addiction in young adolescent children and teenage girls getting pregnant was the result of negligence on the part of their parents. If they take interest in what their children are doing and where they are going, will such a thing never happen. It’s time for the youth to know that giving one’s child a luxurious lifestyle is not enough. Parents should give their children, parents they actually need and not what they think their children need.

At the end of the day, the most overwhelming key to a child's success is the positive involvement of parents. Jane D. Hull